The Enjoyment Of Pet Dog Agility Training

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The purpose of obedience training is to condition your dog to behave in a manner that is consistent with your lifestyle and desired household environment. No dog will be perfect upon adoption, and unfortunately, they don't come with an instruction manual! But proper training, patience, and love will ensure you and your dog live happily together.

Dogs live very much in the 'now', they react to the 'now', yes, they carry past experiences and baggage similar to us, however, their REactions are in the 'now'. That's why does my dog bark at other dogs you can't expect them to know that, she's a really good pack leader sometimes but, has bad days and isn't so good on other days... they just don't understand this concept of inconsistency, they will simply give you the reaction you deserve or warrant in any given moment. Like us, they do carry triggers created in the past, but, and it's a big BUT, unlike us, their reactions can very much be controlled by the way their pack leader reacts in the 'now'.

While keeping your dog on a leash, provide a meeting with another canine. Do this in a place that your dog is not familiar with. Some dogs get territorial when they are in a familiar area and might feel threatened by the other animal.

Control: Take control of the household and let your dog know that you are the alpha leader. As an owner, you will learn about how to assert your dominance and make him follow you. Once you will be able to do this, you will easily succeed at good dog obedience training.

It's important to remember that the dogs are in a stressful situation, so don't assume that a dog's initial shyness means it won't come around to you in time. On the other hand, pay close attention to signs that the dog may have some deeply rooted emotional problems, like aggression, fear, or anxiety. Try to find a dog that seems even-tempered and balanced. Avoid one that is extremely shy or introverted or that is highly reactive or startles easily.

Over time, you will progress to getting him to DO things, in order to drive you to give him treats. A dog can be trained without ever having to be touched! Simply wait for a behaviour to be offered, perhaps a play-bow or a Sit, or eventually a bump of your treat-filled hand with his nose. Then say "YES!" enthusiastically the instant it happens (or use a clicker to mark it) and toss a great treat...or a piece of his dinner. You can then pair a command to the action, and start to ask the dog to perform it in order to get the treat. I've had rescue reactive dogs I couldn't walk up and touch, who would Sit, Gimme Five, or otherwise interact with me in order to solicit a treat. This is *two way communication*, and it's important. Even coming up close to ask for food can be a triumph for a fearful dog.

Here are some training tips that may help while walking your dog. First off, have the attitude that you are in charge and the one who is doing the walking not the one being dragged down the street. Establishing leadership starts when you are putting on your dog's leash. Is your dog going nuts and being hyper? Then wait until it calms down or put it in a "Sit/stay" and wait until it is calmer. Don't reward it for undesirable behavior. Once calm and leashed, do not let it pull the lash tight. The industry standard is a "loose leash." We want to walk with a leash that has some slack in it. That way I there were an incident there is some slack to use to manage any reactive situations that may arise. But, it also just makes for a more relaxed walk for both you and your Dog Behavior training.

Moving objects such as cats, squirrels and kids on bikes are harder. Try them only when your dogs' behavior is consistent. If it's not working then you've simply gone too far too fast. Just back up a bit and try again.

Now that I have self-diagnosed my failure, where to begin? I'll digress and say that I do not give out many treats at my house day to day, we usually reserve those for training, and my dogs are not used to getting treats for basic, household behavior these days. Right or wrong, I just don't mess with treats much on a day to day basis, unless it's a small cookie when I leave the house. As youngsters, or being new to the house, treats are dispensed when learning the acceptable behaviors in our family. But with four adult dogs, the most recent being Gizzer arriving three years ago, daily treats for routine manners have gone by the wayside.

If you are patient and positive then your dog will learn quite quickly and he will be a joy to take out for a walk or when visit people's houses. Dog obedience training is something that every dog needs to learn and it shouldn't take long for him to understand. It is a good way of connecting with your dog and you will be rewarded with a loyal and steadfast companion. Respect your dog and he will respect you.